Relocation / Travelling with Pets

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RELOCATION / TRAVELLING WITH PETS     

 

Although it is becoming easier to transport and move with your pet, the process still requires a great deal of planning and preparation. You will need to factor in many logistical factors such as customs, quarantine requirements for different countries, mode of transport, vaccinations and health certificates.

 

Be prepared for additional costs and you may also need to plan your travelling that you are able to meet your pet at the new destination or make arrangements for someone to do this.

 

Certain dog breeeds for example may be prohibited from entering certain countries. There may also be restrictions on exotic animals such as snakes to New Zealand, for example. There are a number of companies that specialise in pet relocation. They will assist you from start to finish and sort out everything from paperwork to airport transfers and more.

 

  1. What factors influence costs of pet relocation?
  2. Do pets always need to be quarantined?
  3. What sort of crates are need for transporting pets?
  4. Can your pet travel with you in the cabin on aircraft?
  5. Who or what is the IATA?
  6. Is the movement of live animals by airtravel regulated by law?
  7. Where can I read more about specific country import / export regulations for pets and animals/
  8. How can I prepare my pet for air travel?
  9. Are certain dog breeds excluded from air travel?

 

1. What factors influence costs of pet relocation?


Costs depend on departure or arrival locations and the weight and height of the pet. Additional costs will include a special travel crate, transportation to and from airport if necessary as well as vaccinations, blood tests, medical certificates, microchipping, deworming and tick and flea treatment.

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2. Do pets always need to be quarantined?


No, luckily quarantine regulations have been relaxed in most countries, reducing the amount of stress and separation for you and your pet, dependant of course that all their requirements have been met. Some countries still require animals to go into quarantine - these countries include Australia, New Zealand, China and Japan.

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3. What sort of crates are need for transporting pets?


There are different sizes and types of sky kennels available. Crates can be made from plastic or wood. It is important that they meet IATA standards. Crates will need to have a leak-proof floor, need to be properly ventilated and needs to be lockable. It is usually compulsory to have a small blanket and a water bowl inside the crate for the animal. You can also consider popping one of your t-shirts in with your dog for example, so that he/she will have a smell from home.

Read more here abut the latest IATA container / animal carrier requirements.

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4. Can your pet travel with you in the cabin on aircraft?


Some airlines allow pets to travel in an airplane’s cabin. The cage needs to be is small enough to fit under your seat. Some airlines allow small birds to travel in the cabin, but tropical birds such as parrots are usually not allowed in the cabin. If your pet’s cage does not fit under your seat, you will have to ship it as checked baggage.

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5. Who or what is the IATA?


The International Air Transport Association (IATA) is the trade association for the world’s airlines. It represents around 265 airlines or 83% of total air traffic. The IATA helps formulate industry policy on critical aviation issues.The IATA promotes safe, reliable, secure and economical air travel for the benefit of the world's consumers and sets industry standards.

 

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6. Is the movement of live animals by air travel regulated by law?


Live Animals Regulations (LAR) is the worldwide standard for transporting live animals by commercial airlines. Whether it is a pet, an animal transported for zoological or agricultural purposes or for any other reason, the objective of the LAR is to ensure all animals are transported safely and humanely by air.

 

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7. Where can I read more about specific country import / export regulations for pets and animals?


The IATA website has comprehensive information for importing and exporting pets and animals to different countries. Read more here.

 

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8. How can I prepare my pet for air travel?

  • It is a good idea to get the crate which your pet will travel in a few weeks or even months before departure - your pet needs to become familiar and comfortable with the crate.
  • Walk your dog before going to the airport and before check-in.
  • A smaller meal a few hours before travelling is important. Larger meals will mean that your pet will need to toilet or they may get constipated due to not wanting to go in the crate.
  • Most airlines do not alllow pets to be sedated - sedation causes blood pressure to drop, but due to the cabin hold and altitude this will happen naturally and may cause problems in the case of additional sedation. Your veterinarian or travel assistance expert will be able to advise you further.

 

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9. Are certain dog breeds excluded from air travel?

Yes, there are generally restrictions on snub faced dogs such as Boston Terriers, Pugs, Boxers, some Mastiffs, Pekingese, Lhasa Apsos, Shih tzus and Bulldogs due to possible respiration problems. It is best to consult the airline that you will be travelling with. If the dogs are small enough it may be more suitable for them to travel with you in the cabin versus the cargo hold. Consider the time of year for travelling if you have short-nosed dogs that are to be transported in the hold (think of the temperature).

 

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